Heliograph Communication

heliograph_fons

A heliograph (Greek: Ἥλιος helios, meaning “sun”, and γραφειν graphein, meaning “write”) is a wireless solar telegraph that signals by flashes of sunlight (generally using Morse code) reflected by a mirror. The flashes are produced by momentarily pivoting the mirror, or by interrupting the beam with a shutter.

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Most heliographs were variants of the British Army Mance Mark V version. It used a mirror with a small unsilvered spot in the centre.

(1) The sender aligned the heliograph to the target by looking at the reflected target in the mirror and moving his head until the target was hidden by the unsilvered spot.
(2) Keeping his head still, he then adjusted the aiming rod so its cross wires bisected the target.
(3) He then turned up the sighting vane, which covered the cross wires with a diagram of a cross, and aligned the mirror with the tangent and elevation screws so the small shadow that was the reflection of the unsilvered spot hole was on the cross target. This indicated that the sunbeam was pointing at the target.
(4) The flashes were produced by a keying mechanism that tilted the mirror up a few degrees at the push of a lever at the back of the instrument.

If the sun was in front of the sender, its rays were reflected directly from this mirror to the receiving station. If the sun was behind the sender, the sighting rod was replaced by a second mirror, to capture the sunlight from the main mirror and reflect it to the receiving station.

Via Wikipedia.

Flag Semaphores

semaphores

Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands.

Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.

The current flag semaphore system uses two short poles with square flags, which a signalman holds in different positions to signal letters of the alphabet and numbers. The signalman holds one pole in each hand, and extends each arm in one of eight possible directions. Except for in the rest position, the flags do not overlap.

The flags are colored differently based on whether the signals are sent by sea or by land. At sea, the flags are colored red and yellow (the Oscar flag), while on land, they are white and blue (the Papa flag). Flags are not required; their purpose is to make the characters more obvious.

Numbers can be signaled by first signaling “Numerals”. To change back to letters, a signalman would simply signal “J”.

Via Wikipedia.